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The University of Tennessee

The Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Department

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About the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department

» Vision and Mission Statement
» About the University of Tennessee

Vision and Mission Statement

The vision of the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department is to be a center of inspired learning that nurtures innovation, critical thinking, and leadership in chemical and biomolecular engineering education and research.

In fulfillment of this vision, our mission is to train students to utilize molecular information and discovery to create innovative products and processes by emphasizing fundamental understanding of physical, chemical, and biological processes; engineering design and synthesis; leadership; ethics;  and interdisciplinary perspectives on technology, economic, and social issues.

Our undergraduate and graduate programs produce creative innovators who are capable of taking leadership positions in chemical and biological engineering. Graduates of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, possess the knowledge base, intellectual skills, and professional commitment which prepare them for innovative technical leadership, graduate study, productive service to society, and continued professional growth through lifelong learning. Preparation is based in the attainment of the Program Educational Objectives identified below, regular evaluation of the achievement of these Objectives, and use of evaluation results to improve the educational process.

  • Graduates of the UT-Knoxville Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering who enter professional practice will demonstrate a high level of technical competence, along with career progression toward positions of technical or managerial leadership.

  • Graduates of the UT-Knoxville Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering who pursue full-time graduate or advanced professional study will complete their programs of study successfully.

  • Graduates of the UT-Knoxville Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering will continue their professional growth through lifelong learning.

These Program Educational Objectives are achieved by ensuring that our graduates satisfy our stated Program Student Outcomes.

Graduates as leaders and innovators, not just highly skilled specialists.

The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is one of the oldest engineering programs in the South. It was included as an option in Chemistry as early as 1905 and became a separate department in 1936. The Masters program was begun in 1935 and the Ph.D. program in 1949. The University of Tennessee’s Ph.D. program was the first doctoral program in engineering offered by any institution in Tennessee, public or private. The undergraduate program in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering has been continuously accredited since 1939, making it one of the four oldest accredited chemical engineering programs in the South.

The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and The University of Tennessee are ideally located in a geographic region with a high density of major chemical companies and smaller consulting firms. Our programs reach out to other engineering and science departments at UT, to the nearby Oak Ridge National Laboratory and to industry, forming larger partnerships and creating an unsurpassed teaching and research environment. Both students and faculty realize the benefits of these collaborations through the development of high-quality, interdisciplinary programs.

Our student body is very diverse with a significant female and minority representation. Many of the students participate in the engineering co-op program (40%), engineering internships (20%), or undergraduate research (20%).

Knoxville is one of the most pleasant cities in the United States in which to live, and The University of Tennessee one of the most appealing environments you could choose for either an undergraduate or graduate education. We look forward to hearing of your further interest.

For more information on the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, visit: http://www.engr.utk.edu/cbe/

You might also want to browse:

» Our undergraduate recruiting brochure
» Our graduate recruiting brochure
» The Departmental Newsletters
» The Departmental Annual Reports

» Links to areas of interest in the region

The University of Tennessee

Founded in 1794 as Blount College, the first nonsectarian college west of the Appalachians, The University of Tennessee today is the state's largest university and Land-Grant institution with about 17,000 undergraduates, 7,500 graduate and professional students, and a faculty of 1,600. Bachelors degrees are offered in over 150 fields, masters degrees in 85, and doctoral degrees in 52.

Although a program entitled "Chemical Engineering" appeared in the University of Tennessee catalog as early as 1905, true chemical engineering courses were not offered until 1934, first in the Department of Chemistry and two years later in a separate Department of Chemical Engineering. The first Chemical faculty member was Robert M. Boarts, a Ph.D. graduate of the University of Michigan and student of the legendary W.L. Badger. The Masters program was begun in 1935 and the Ph.D. program in 1949 as the first doctoral program in engineering offered by any institution in Tennessee. The undergraduate program in chemical engineering received its initial accreditation from the Engineers' Council for Professional Development (now known as ABET) in 1939, making it one of the first four chemical engineering programs in the South to receive accreditation. (Programs at Georgia Tech and Virginia Tech were accredited in 1938, while those at Tennessee and Louisiana State were accredited in 1939). The program has been continuously accredited since that time. It is currently accredited by the Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.ABET.org. The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department has had only seven Heads in its 58-year history: Dr. Robert M. Boarts (1936-1960), Dr. Homer F. Johnson (1960-1984), Dr. Joseph J. Perona (1984-1990), Dr. John W. Prados (1990-1993), Dr. Charles F. Moore (1993-2000), Dr. John Collier (2000-2006), and Dr. Bamin Khomami (2006-Present).

The University of Tennessee is located in Knoxville near the headwaters of the Tennessee river and roughly in the center of the Great Valley of East Tennessee. The main range of the Appalachian Mountains lies 40 miles to the southeast, with the Cumberland Plateau about he same distance to the northwest. Within an hour's drive are six Tennessee Valley Authority lakes and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Knoxville metropolitan area has a population of 600,000 but enjoys a pleasant, generally uncrowded atmosphere and consistently ranks among the nation's top ten metropolitan areas in surveys on quality of life. East Tennessee has a four-season climate, ranging from summer temperatures in the 90's to winter temperatures cold enough for snow skiing in nearby mountain resorts.

For further information about The University of Tennessee, visit their home page.

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