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College Shines at Chancellor’s Honors


The Tickle College of Engineering fared well at the 2018 Chancellor’s Honors banquet Tuesday night, with faculty and students alike taking home several awards.

The 2018 Chancellor’s Honors banquet was held Tuesday night, with Tickle College of Engineering faculty and students taking some of the top honors.

Amany Alshibli, a chemical engineering major, and Cullen Johnson, of industrial engineering, were each named Torchbearers, the highest honor a student can earn at UT. Only nine students across the university as a whole were chosen for the award this year.

Alshibli, a Haslam Scholar and Grand Challenge Scholar, pursued research in cardiac regenerative medicine at the Scottish Centre for Regenerative Medicine, tutors students and assists with science programs at Pond Gap Elementary School, and organized the Einstein Science Club at Annoor Academy.

Johnson revamped the Intervarsity Christian Fellowship’s men’s Bible study—Brother to Brother—which provides leadership and service opportunities to male students, served on the college’s student advisory board, and served internships at top companies including Norfolk Southern and Under Armour.

Assistant professor and Southern Company Faculty Fellow in nuclear engineering Jamie Coble was the recipient of the Angie Warren Perkins Award. Named for the first dean of women at UT, it honors outstanding leadership in campus governance or administration at the level of department head, director, or below.

Coble’s research involves many graduate students and is aimed at supporting the safety, security, and economics of nuclear power systems. She serves as a faculty advisor to the university’s student chapter of Women in Nuclear and is responsible for helping develop a PhD-level course on applications of artificial intelligence and optimization in nuclear power systems, as well as updating the undergraduate course on nuclear system dynamics and controls.

Kevin Tomsovic was recognized with a Research and Creative Achievement honor, which is bestowed to senior faculty in recognition of excellence in research, scholarship, and creative achievement.

Tomsovic, director of CURENT and the CTI Professor in the Min H. Kao Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, was honored for helping revive the university’s power program, resulting in several new hires, a significant expansion of research activities, and UT’s recognition as one of the top power system and power electronics programs in the country, as well as for his efforts in the creation of CURENT.

Cong Trinh was honored with a Research and Creative Achievement — Professional Promise award, which goes to faculty members who are early in their careers for excellence in research, scholarship, and creative achievement.

Trinh, the Ferguson Fellow and associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, has secured more than $4 million in funding for his research, which focuses on understanding complex cellular systems and developing novel tools to harness them for biotechnological applications, and has earned both CAREER and DARPA awards for his efforts.

The university also honors one group each year with a Success in Multidisciplinary Research award, given for cross-college collaborations. This year’s winner was Water for Agriculture, which included four member of civil and environmental engineering: Professor, Henry Goodrich Chair of Excellence and director of Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Thanos Papanicolaou; associate department head of Undergraduate Studies and professor John Schwartz; assistant professor Jon Hathaway; and research assistant professor Chris Wilson.

 The team partnered the Tickle College of Engineering with the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources to study changes in climate, land use, and demand affect the quantity, quality, and availability of water for agriculture and forestry using modeling and field-testing.

Several students also took home awards for their efforts.

Extraordinary Professional Promise Awards:

  • Reza Yazdanpanah Abdolmalaki
  • Rekesh Mikail Ali
  • Madelynn M. Allison
  • Amany Alshibli
  • Zachariah L. Arwood
  • Shaghayegh Aslanzadeh
  • Chelsey Ann Brummer
  • Nelly M. Cantillo Cuello
  • Jared C. Clements
  • Taner Cokyasar
  • Katelyn S. Curley
  • Seyyed Ali Davari
  • David A. DeSimone
  • Yongjie Ding
  • Danika M. Dorris
  • Xuesong Fan
  • Rui Feng
  • Farnaz Foroughian
  • Bingye Han
  • Mohammad Aminul Haque
  • Abigail H. Harr
  • Ava Hedayatipour
  • Shahram Hatefi Hesari
  • Morgan Christen Jenkins
  • Ryan C. Johnson
  • Andrew L. Kaminsky
  • Zhenye (Allen) Kang
  • Chanho Lee
  • Hang Li
  • Gerald (J. T.) Liso
  • Jose Manuel Luna Garcia
  • Ran Ma
  • Jeremy Lee Melton
  • Brian J. Mendoza
  • Ali Mohsin
  • Christopher Patrick Muir
  • Christopher Andrew Neal
  • Ali Yousefzadi Nobakht
  • Rania Oueslati
  • Raul Irvin Palomares
  • Farhan Quaiyum
  • Mohammad Ehsan Raoufat
  • Sydney Katherine Reeder
  • Jeremiah Scott Roberts
  • Samira Shamsir
  • Aashish Sharma
  • Mst Shamim Ara Shawkat
  • Jordan E. Shurmer
  • Jian Sun
  • Farshid Tamjid
  • Taylor Anne Woodward
  • Fan Zhang
  • Brenna K. Zimmerman

Extraordinary Academic Achievement:

  • Amany Alshibli
  • Chandler Jackson Bauder
  • Emily Ann Beckman
  • Grant Bruer
  • Michele Nicole Christy
  • Matthew Ryan Davis
  • Ethan Jedidiah Deakins
  • Danika M. Dorris
  • Christopher J. Haseler
  • Katherine L. Krouse
  • David Michael Marsh
  • Jacob Andrew McCoy
  • Christopher Patrick Muir
  • Andy Dillon Skipper

Top Collegiate Scholar Awards:

  • Grant Richard Bruer
  • David Michael Marsh
  • Luke Johnston Mills
  • Jonathan Trent Mitchell
  • Austin Daniel Mullen
  • Phuc Tran Hoang Pham
  • Sophie Elizabeth Wardick

Scholar Athlete Awards:

  • Michele Nicole Christy


Shupe Named New Executive Director of Development in College

Brian ShupeBrian Shupe took over as executive director of development in the Tickle College of Engineering at the start of April, following the retirement of longtime executive director Dorothy Bryson.

In his new role, Shupe will serve as a major gifts officer for the college and oversee its development and fundraising efforts.

“Brian will continue to grow the phenomenal support that we have been building for the last few years,” said Wayne Davis, dean of the college. “He is someone familiar to our faculty, staff, board of advisors, and alumni and should be able to hit the ground running.”

His duties include managing and coaching development officers and assistants, implementing fundraising activities and strategies, directing the college’s strategic plan in collaboration with the dean and ensuring goals and objectives are met.

Prior to the promotion, Shupe was senior director of development for two years and director of development for six and a half years at the University of Tennessee.

“I’m honored to have been chosen for this position and look forward to helping our college in its upward trajectory,” said Shupe. “We have a lot of phenomenal resources, faculty and research here at UT, and a lot of that comes directly back to the support given by our alumni.”

He previously served as an account executive for The Vol Network.

Shupe holds a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville along with a paralegal certification.

He and his wife, Bronwyn, have a 14-year-old son, Hunter.

Accolades — Notable nods for mid-April 2018

Einstein Award Surfaces for Papanicolaou’s Breakthrough Water Research

Thanos Papanicolaou

Thanos Papanicolaou

Swimmers, tubers, and boaters often have the same question when they are in or around the water: What, exactly, is down there?

While a silted creek might not prevent someone from enjoying a day in the sun, it’s a different case for those whose jobs depend on knowing what lies beneath.

UT’s Henry Goodrich Chair of Excellence Thanos Papanicolaou has helped solve that riddle by developing a way to allow researchers to see underwater sediment and predict its likelihood for mobility. For this breakthrough, he has been named the 2018 Hans Albert Einstein award winner from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). It is perhaps the most prestigious distinction that someone in hydraulic engineering can earn.

Read more about the Einstein Award.


O’Quinn for the Win: Nuclear Engineering Student Chosen for Top Fellowship

Eric O'Quinn

Eric O’Quinn

Eric O’Quinn, a graduate student in nuclear engineering, has been chosen by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science for enrollment in its graduate student research program.

The award goes to students identified as having research in areas that the Office of Science deems critical for the nation and provides them research opportunities in a national lab while working on their thesis.

“I was thrilled to find out I had gotten the award,” said O’Quinn. “This is a great opportunity, both to continue doing my research and to work with our collaborators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.”

Read more about Eric O’Quinn.


AIChE Students Power on to Nationals

2018 AIChE UT ChemE Car Team 600

2018 AIChE UT ChemE Car Team

UT AIChE students placed second in the Chem-E-Car Competition at the 2018 AIChE Southern Student Regional Conference hosted by Louisiana State University on Saturday, April 7, 2018. They advance to the 2018 Annual AIChE Student Conference at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in October.

AIChE’s Chem-E-Car Competition engages college students in designing and constructing a car powered by a chemical energy source, that will safely carry a specified load over a given distance and stop. The team’s car, the Myst-Air-y Machine, is powered by a PEM hydrogen fuel cell, which uses hydrogen from a rubber balloon and reacts with oxygen from the air to produce the electricity.

The Chem-E-Car team members are co-captains Christopher Neal and Catherine Weiss, Matt Adams, Matt Bush, Maria Bruce, Jason Chung, Hana Gouto, Tyson Johnson, Michelle Lames, Shannon Mulhall, Jason Pan, and Lacey Roberts.
Dr. Gabriel Goenaga (CBE) is the team advisor. Dr. Douglas Aaron (MABE) is the team safety advisor.

Also, Kelsey Grady and Lacey Roberts competed in the Poster Competition. Kelsey Grady placed third in the competition. Her research is “Effect of Membrane Pretreatment on the Mass Transport of Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.” Kelsey is in Dr. Thomas Zawodzinski’s research group. Zawodzinski is the Governor’s Chair for Electrical Energy Storage and Conversion.


ASCE Calls Collingwood for Shuai Li

Shuai Li

Shuai Li

Shuai Li, assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering, has been awarded the Collingwood Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) for his paper “Integrating Natural Language Processing and Spatial Reasoning for Utility Compliance Checking.”

Li was first author on this paper during his previous time at Purdue. The Collingwood Prize recognizes an outstanding paper published by investigators under the age of 35.

Read more about Shuai Li.


Alshibli and Students Bring Home the Croes Medal

Khalid Alshibli

Khalid Alshibli

Professor Khalid Alshibli and his former civil and environmental engineering graduate students Maha Jarrar and Andrew Druckery won ASCE’s J. James R. Croes Medal for their paper “Influence of Particle Morphology on 3D Kinematic Behavior and Strain Localization of Sheared Sand.”

This prestigious and competitive award is selected from outstanding papers across all of ASCE’s divisions.

Read more about Khalid Alshibli.


Vélez Scores Three-Minute Win-it

Jessica Vélez

Jessica Vélez

Jessica Vélez, a PhD candidate in the UT–Oak Ridge National Laboratory Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education, took first place in the Three-Minute Thesis competition held last week as a part of UT’s Graduate and Professional Student Appreciation Week.

Her research is titled “Investigating the Relationship between the Fungus Cenococcum geophilum and the Biofuel Crop Poplar.” Specifically, she is looking at the presence of toxic metals.

Read more about Vélez and the Three-Minute Thesis.


UTSI Students Win with Wu

Starting from back row, left to right - participants and previous winners: Yifan Li, Adam Harris, Gaoqiang Yang, Shule Yu, Julie King, Matthew Schwartz, Dr. Javed Seif, Stefen Lindorfer, Lara Lash, Jason Hah, Katherine Stamper, Zhenya Kang, Autumn Douthitt, and Drs. Jimmy and Susan Wu. Not pictured; Adam Evans

From back row, left to right, participants and previous winners: Yifan Li, Adam Harris, Gaoqiang Yang, Shule Yu, Julie King, Matthew Schwartz, Javed Seif, Stefen Lindorfer, Lara Lash, Jason Hah, Katherine Stamper, Zhenya Kang, Autumn Douthitt, and Jimmy and Susan Wu. Not pictured: Adam Evans.

The University of Tennessee Space Institute held its third annual Wu Student Presentation Competition on March 28, 2018. Twelve students participated with each allotted a 10 minute time slot, followed by a Q&A session.

The first place winner received a $2,000 travel grant, the second place winner received a $1,000 travel grant. The travel grants are for students to gain additional experience and to sharpen presentation skills through attending a conference of their choice.

This competition is named for Susan and Jimmy Wu, who were the first husband and wife team hired as faculty members of the Space Institute in 1965. They have more than fifty-five years of combined service to UTSI and the aerospace community.

Read more about the Wu Competition winners.

UT Nuclear Engineering Student Chosen for Top Fellowship


Eric O'QuinnUT’s Eric O’Quinn, a graduate student in nuclear engineering, has been chosen by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science for enrollment in its graduate student research program.

The award goes to students identified as having research in areas that the Office of Science deems critical for the nation and provides them research opportunities in a national lab while working on their thesis.

“I was thrilled to find out I had gotten the award,” said O’Quinn. “This is a great opportunity, both to continue doing my research and to work with our collaborators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.”

A native of Alexandria, Louisiana, O’Quinn came to UT for graduate school after he and his wife fell in love with UT’s campus and the Knoxville area on a visit.

In the three years since that time, he has worked with Pietro F. Pasqua Fellow Maik Lang in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at UT.

O’Quinn’s work revolves around what are known as disordered materials, such as glasses and ceramics, that may have a more complex structure at the atomic level than previously thought.

Due to their design, such materials hold great promise for energy, including use in nuclear fuel and in fuel cells.

“We need to study and research them at the atomic level to gain an overall knowledge about their limitations and abilities,” said O’Quinn. “There’s so much cutting edge research being performed at UT, particularly in nuclear engineering. It’s great to see how what you do makes an impact.”

O’Quinn will spend his yearlong fellowship working under ORNL scientist Matthew Tucker, developing new ways of modeling the data he has collected.

The Office of Science funds the scholarship, with a monthly stipend and general expenses included.

This is the second consecutive year that a UT nuclear engineering student has received such an honor, with Jonah Duran having been chosen in 2017.

UT’s Liaw Named Fellow of Exclusive Materials Science Society


Peter Liaw

Peter Liaw

UT’s Peter Liaw has spent most of his adult life gaining a better understanding of metals, alloys, and composites.

For those efforts, Liaw, the Ivan Racheff Chair of Excellence in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, has earned what is considered to be the highest honor in his field: being named a fellow of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS).

“I am honored and humbled by this selection,” said Liaw. “It is a very prestigious society, one that I first joined as a student nearly 40 years ago. To see that it comes full circle is a great pleasure.”

Being a TMS fellow places Liaw in exclusive company, as its rules stipulate that there can only be 100 living fellows at any given time.

Liaw’s expertise comes mainly in the areas of material fracturing and fatiguing and in the prediction of how long a particular material will last in a given environment and use.

Since coming to UT in 1993, he has expanded his work to include mechanical behavior, nondestructive evaluation, biomaterials, and processing of alloys and composites, often in conjunction with Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

In its notice about Liaw’s election as a fellow, TMS mentioned his “seminal contributions to the fundamental understanding of fatigue and fracture behavior in metals and alloys, including advanced structural materials.”

To that effect, he has served as an editor on more than 50 books and special journal issues, has published more than 800 journal papers, and has mentored numerous graduate students who have gone on to win awards.

Liaw said he is very grateful to his students, research associates, and colleagues at UT, ORNL, and around the world, and that he “learns greatly from them.”

He also thanked the support and funding he has gotten in his career, including from UT and ORNL, Westinghouse, the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, and from industries.

“Dr. Liaw has long been a driving force and valuable member of our department,” said Department Head and Director of the Joint Institute for Advanced Materials, Veerle Keppens. “This recognition serves as a reminder of how important he is to UT and to our field in general.”

Upon graduating Northwestern University in 1980, Liaw spent 13 years at Westinghouse’s Research and Development Center, earning multiple outstanding performance awards.

He is also a fellow of the American Society for Metals, has served on numerous boards both there and with TMS, and has won several awards since coming to UT, including the Outstanding Teacher award, the Moses E. and Mayme Brooks Distinguished Professor award, the Engineering Research Fellow award, the National Alumni Association Distinguished Service Professor award, the L. R. Hesler award, and the John Fisher Professorship at UT.

In addition to his academic roles, Liaw served as director of the NSF Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training program, director of the NSF International Materials Institutes program, and the director of the NSF Major Research Instrumentation program here at UT.

Daily Beacon: EcoCar 3 Project Drives Innovation, Fosters Networking for Engineers

A multidisciplinary group of students from the college are int he final phases of the EcoCar3 Project. The North American competition is sponsored by General Motors, the US Department of Energy and the Argonne National Laboratory.

During the first year of the competition, UT engineering students were assigned to perform market research to build and analyze a consumer target market. The outer design, simulation of mechanical integration, electrical wiring components, and control system design were completed within the second and third years. With each passing year, the car’s progress is ranked and rewarded. In May, the final competition will close out the five-year project. 

Read more about the project. 

Water Research Breakthrough Nets Papanicolaou Einstein Award

Thanos Papanicolaou

Henry Goodrich Chair of Excellence Thanos Papanicolaou at the Hydraulics and Sedimentation Lab.


Swimmers, tubers, and boaters often have the same question when they are in or around the water: What, exactly, is down there?

While a silted creek might not prevent someone from enjoying a day in the sun, it’s a different case for those whose jobs depend on knowing what lies beneath.

UT’s Henry Goodrich Chair of Excellence Thanos Papanicolaou has helped solve that riddle by developing a way to allow researchers to see underwater sediment and predict its likelihood for mobility.

Papanicolaou’s method uses a concept called “the aerial probability of entrainment,” which helps predict how underwater materials will spread. The concept builds on a theory pioneered by Hans Albert Einstein, son of the legendary physicist.

Einstein was a key figure in the development of what is now known as hydraulic engineering—the study of water’s flow, how it carries sediment, and how it impacts the environment.

For his breakthrough, Papanicolaou has been named the 2018 Hans Albert Einstein award winner from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). It is perhaps the most prestigious distinction that someone in hydraulic engineering can earn.

“I’m honored to be chosen for such a major award and for the recognition it brings to my work,” said Papanicolaou, who earned his doctorate in 1997 by doing his dissertation on Einstein’s work.

“Winning an award named for someone whose research you studied and built off of is a surreal feeling.”

Einstein relied on calculations and probabilities to determine aspects of flow, but Papanicolaou’s application of modern sensor technology has taken the work one step further, improving reliability and accuracy.

Using advanced techniques such as aerial sensing and image analysis as well as the use of “green lidar” and radio frequency IDs to map mobilization of the river beds, Papanicolaou was able to identify sediment flow. He also incorporated turbulence to predict how bursts of turbulence affect the onset of mobilization of sediment.

His breakthrough could give rise to the possibility of other uses, including eliminating the need to dredge through better design of waterways.

“The concept of the probability of entrainment linked with sensing techniques allow us to have eyes underwater and then to develop a new set of models based off sediment flow and residence time,” said Papanicolaou, who also serves as director of the Tennessee Water Resources Research Center. “It opens up the possibility of knowing the life expectancy of dams to the design of self-cleaning waterways through a better understanding of flow.”

Papanicolaou has been recognized with the Hunter Rouse Hydraulics Medal award for his work on landscape connectivity and aiding to the development of the discipline catchment geomorphology—how all of the land around a waterway can affect flow—which ASCE noted in awarding him the honor along with the Einstein award.

ASCE has given the Einstein award annually since 1989 for “significant contribution to the engineering profession in the area of erosion control, sedimentation, and/or waterway development,” and considers researchers and projects from around the world.

Papanicolaou will receive the award at a ceremony during the Environmental Water Resources Institute Congress in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in June.

Since 1997, he has received nearly $20 million in combined funding from the National Science Foundation, NASA, USDA, NOAA, the Office of Naval Research, and both the US Departments of Energy and Transportation as well as several state departments of transportation. Papanicolaou spearheaded the establishment of the Hydraulics and Sedimentation Lab at UT and is currently the co-director of the Intensively Managed Landscapes Critical Zone Observatory.

Rendering of the South Side of New Engineering Complex

Built for the Future


Engineering at UT has undergone almost constant change since its first courses in surveying were offered 180 years ago.

Departments and disciplines have come and gone, barriers and boundaries of study have emerged and been developed, and the students, faculty, and buildings on campus have continued a steady drumbeat of growth.

“This building is the latest sign of both our growth and our university’s commitment to providing the best experience possible to our students.”

—Dean Wayne Davis

The next phase of the Tickle College of Engineering’s evolution will soon begin with the construction of a $129 million, 228,000-square-foot building that will house the nuclear engineering department, the innovative Jerry E. Stoneking engage™ Engineering Fundamentals program, the Joseph C. and Judith E. Cook Grand Challenge Honors program, the Min H. and Yu-Fan Kao Innovation and Collaboration Studio (ICS), and many other laboratories for advanced engineering research.

The yet-to-be-named building is being designed to serve as a “Gateway to Engineering,” and to present a new look for the university by creating a new entrance for campus via the Hill and surrounding areas.

A newly created assistant deanship—whose role will be to build collaborations between the college, the university, and corporate partners to enrich student design projects—will be based in ICS.

“This building is the latest sign of both our growth and our university’s commitment to providing the best experience possible for our students,” said Dean Wayne Davis. “We will be able to enhance the educational journey of our honors students and our freshmen, and we will finally be able to have our nuclear engineering department be in a building worthy of their nationally recognized status.”

For nuclear engineering, having a building designed with modern loadbearing standards means the department can have laboratory, classroom, and research space and equipment not previously possible in its former home in Pasqua Hall.

Nuclear engineering students will have more opportunities to conduct research as well, thanks to a unique design feature of the building.

The western portion of the building closest to the stadium will house student instructional spaces and offices. It is required to close during major stadium events, whereas the eastern portion can remain open. It will include both general and nuclear engineering research laboratories, allowing experiments to run continuously without interruption.

The building will be particularly important for undergraduates, with all first-year classes, labs, and design laboratories to be located there, as well as observation areas where passers-by and tour groups can watch students at work. ICS will also support design work done by sophomore, junior, and senior students.

Rendering of New Engineering Complex

South-facing view of the yet-to-be-named New Engineering Complex. Preliminary renderings by McCarty Holsaple McCarty in collaboration with SGJJR.


“The building illustrates an excellent view of the significance of engineering as a profession and as an important component of the UT campus,” said Masood Parang, associate dean of academic and student affairs. “It will also provide our students with new and better opportunities. We are certainly placing a premium on engineering labs, classrooms, and maker spaces, all of which will help better prepare our students for their educational and professional needs.”

Honors students will also see their opportunities expand in the new space with greater emphasis placed on equipping them with the tools to find new ways to solve some of the world’s most pressing challenges.

Outside will see welcoming plazas and green spaces, while entry through the atrium will present students and visitors alike with information and history about the college.

Demolition will begin this summer, with the groundbreaking set for the fall.

The project will be closely coordinated with the first phase of new improvements slated for Neyland Stadium, which will also begin in 2018 and are set to include a new pedestrian plaza between the stadium and Neyland Drive.

UT Students Helping Improve Knox-Area Businesses


Students from IBEP Listen to a Representative from SCORE

Students from the Tickle College of Engineering and Haslam College of Business listen as a representative of SCORE—the nation’s largest group devoted to helping small businesses—talks about the program. The students are part of the inaugural Integrated Business and Engineering Program at UT.


UT’s Integrated Business and Engineering program (IBEP) got off to a solid start last fall, when undergraduate students from the Haslam College of Business and Tickle College of Engineering teamed up to design futuristic bus kiosks.

Those booths benefitted Local Motors and its driverless bus system, Ollie, which is set to be a key feature in downtown Knoxville.

Now, those same students are helping other local businesses.

The Knoxville Business Support Network is a conglomeration of the Tennessee Small Business Development Center, the Knoxville Area Urban League, Greater Knoxville SCORE, the Knoxville Entrepreneur Center, and the Knoxville Chamber of Commerce.

Those groups have banded together to increase business opportunities and help small business owners in the greater Knoxville area.

“Students hope to help improve the search process for finding information,” said Mary Brow, IBEP director. “Anything that makes it easier for small businesses to flourish helps our city, community, and our campus, so it behooves us to help that happen.”

The students have also researched how each individual group could better spread its message.

They will present their ideas and findings to the various groups on April 18, using feedback from them to further improve the proposals throughout the fall semester.

IBEP began in the fall of 2017 as a way to bring together business and engineering students, providing them with perspectives from the other side of the production process and opening up possibilities to collaborate. Students who complete the program will graduate ready to lead at the apex of business and engineering.

As the first cohort of 19 students continue this fall as juniors, a new cohort of sophomores will be getting started. The eventual goal is to have cohorts of 20 students—10 from each college—at each of the sophomore, junior, and senior levels.

Faculty and Staff Honored at Annual Awards Dinner

Faculty, staff, Board of Advisors members, and guests enjoyed the annual Faculty and Staff Awards Dinner, held for 2018 at the Knoxville Museum of Art.


Musicians from the UT School of Music entertained during the awards dinner reception.

Jazz musicians from the UT School of Music entertained during the awards dinner reception.

Yvette Gooden, winner of an Outstanding Staff Award, attended the dinner with husband Vernon Gooden.

Yvette Gooden, winner of an Outstanding Staff Award, attended the dinner with husband Vernon Gooden.

Award winners and guests mingled with other faculty, staff, and Board of Advisors members at the Knoxville Museum of Art.

Award winners and guests mingled with other faculty, staff, and Board of Advisors members at the Knoxville Museum of Art.

Dorothy Bryson, left, who recently retired as the college's Executive Director of Development, chats with Catherine Turner. Turner's spouse, Ron Turner, is a member of the college's Board of Advisors.

Dorothy Bryson, left, who recently retired as the college’s Executive Director of Development, chats with Catherine Turner. Turner’s spouse, Ron Turner, is a member of the college’s Board of Advisors.

The Faculty and Staff Awards themselves got a new look for 2018.

The Faculty and Staff Awards themselves got a new look for 2018.

Kamrul Islam, at right, won a Teaching Fellow Award for 2018. His wife, Mita Islam, accompanied him at the dinner.

Kamrul Islam, at right, won a Teaching Fellow Award for 2018. His wife, Mita Islam, accompanied him at the dinner.

The elaborate Richard Jolley artwrk in the great hall of the Knoxville Museum of Art made for an elegant dinner setting.

The elaborate Richard Jolley artwork in the great hall of the Knoxville Museum of Art made for an elegant dinner setting.

Dorothy Bryson, second from left, was recognized for her exemplary service as Executive Director of Development for the college. To her left is Assistant Professor Jamie Coble, who won the 2018 Leon and Nancy Cole Superior Teaching Award.

Dorothy Bryson, second from left, was recognized for her exemplary service as Executive Director of Development for the college. To her left is Assistant Professor Jamie Coble, who won the 2018 Leon and Nancy Cole Superior Teaching Award.

Dean Wayne Davis and Associate Dean Masood Parang, at left and right, presented the 2018 Outstanding Staff Awards. From second left are Kathy Williams, David Rogers, Ashly Perason, and Yvette Gooden.

Dean Wayne Davis and Associate Dean Masood Parang, at left and right, presented the 2018 Outstanding Staff Awards. From second left are Kathy Williams, David Rogers, Ashly Perason, and Yvette Gooden.

2018 Teaching award recipients included, from left with Dean Davis, Jenny Retherford, Eric Wade, Mike Berry, Kamrul Islam, Jamie Coble, and Jon Hathaway

2018 Teaching award recipients included, from left with Dean Davis, Jenny Retherford, Eric Wade, Mike Berry, Kamrul Islam, Jamie Coble, and Jon Hathaway

Assistant professors David Donovan, at left, and James Coder, third from left, received the Dean's Junior Faculty Research Excellence Awards, presented by Dean Davis and Associate Dean William Dunne, far right.

Assistant professors David Donovan, at left, and James Coder, third from left, received the Dean’s Junior Faculty Research Excellence Awards, presented by Dean Davis and Associate Dean William Dunne, far right.

Dean Davis and Associate Dean Dunne presented research awards to, from left, Haixuan Xu, Cong Trinh, Andy Sarles, Garrett Rose, and Eric Lukosi.

Dean Davis and Associate Dean Dunne presented research awards to, from left, Haixuan Xu, Cong Trinh, Andy Sarles, Garrett Rose, and Eric Lukosi.

Professors John Ma and Fran Li, second and third from left, received Research Achievement Awards.

Professors John Ma and Fran Li, second and third from left, received Research Achievement Awards.

Leslie Benmark was the 2018 Dougherty Award recipient.

Leslie Benmark was the 2018 Dougherty Award recipient.

Associate Dean Lynne Parker presented Dean Wayne Davis with a memory book, compiled by administrative staff, in honor of his upcoming retirement.

Associate Dean Lynne Parker presented Dean Wayne Davis with a memory book, compiled by administrative staff, in honor of his upcoming retirement.

Dean Wayne Davis

Dean Wayne Davis

Dougherty Award winner Leslie Benmark spoke of her experiences in engineering.

Dougherty Award winner Leslie Benmark spoke of her experiences in engineering.

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